Untouchable

“The outcastes were not allowed to mount the platform surrounding the well, because if they were ever to draw water from it, the Hindus of the three upper castes would consider the water polluted” (22)

Anand, Mulk Raj. Untouchable. Penguin Classics, 1986. Page 22.

Here Anand depicts the worker as reliant. There is also an implication that the working class is filthy, although this implication is made by the Hindus and not Anand himself. Either way, it is shown that for water, a basic necessity, the working class must rely on assistance from upper class citizens

Untouchable

“‘Why aren’t the latrines clean, you rogue of a Bakhe! There is not one fit to go near! I have walked all around! Do you know you are responsible for my piles? I caught the contagion sitting on one of those unclean latrines!'” (9)

What is evident in class distinction from the beginning of the novel is how Bakha’s treatment is evidence of the way social hierachy is met with rigidity: noting how Havildar Charat Singh, the famous hockey player (9) who is addressing Bakha in this quotation, immediately dehumanizes him because he is of a much lower social class. The stratification of groups here is already solidified under the idea that there is a presumed quality of character to go along with the roles; how could Bakha even go about improving his life quality when all the people above him have no qualms with treating him like he deserves his place?