Untouchable

“The girl was a potential rival. Gulabo hated the very sight of her innocent, honest face, though she would not confess, even to herself, that she was jealous of the sweeper girl. But she unconsciously betrayed her feeling in the mockery and light-hearted abuse which she showered on Sohini. The consciousness of that prettiness which people’s compliments stimulated in her, made the young woman vaguely surmise it all”

Anand, Mulk R. Untouchable. London, England New York, N.Y: Penguin, 1986. Page 17.

Interestingly, Anand shows that there are very little that separates the two girls – in fact, Sohini was superior to Gulabo. Yet class works to both cement Sohini’s subjugation and to ease Gulabo’s insecurity.

The Middle Years

“What, moreover, was the use of being an approved novelist if one couldn’t establish a relation between such figures; as, for instance, that the young man was the son of the opulent matron, and that the humble dependant, the daughter of a clergyman or an officer, nourished a secret passion for him?” 

James, Henry, 1843-1916, and Percy Lubbock. The Middle Years. New York: C. Scribner’s sons, 1917, 610.

The most striking thing about this passage and the use of observation is the fact that maybe Dencombe is attempting to find meaning in the meaningless, just like how he is seeking out purpose and fulfillment towards the end of his life.